Celtic LION Ring in .925 Sterling Silver - Lion Ring of PROTECTION - Warrior Royal Power LEO with Gemstone choice


$59.99




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  • Two-headed Medieval Renaissance Lion .925 Sterling Silver Ring - Seeing the Past & Future.
  • Protecter & Warrior, Primal Royal Power.
  • Sterling Silver with your choice of gemstone, see gemstones available in the pictures.
  • Shown in picture with carnelian, hematite, and bloodstone - large version.
  • Handcrafted in Sterling Silver by Wellstone Jewelry in the USA


Symbolism and Meaning of the Celtic Lion Ring:


In ancient times the Lion was the companion of the Goddess. At times it represented her power to destroy and was associated with Ishtar, Astarte, Cybele and Kali. The lion was a symbol of Time, which these goddesses embodied and controlled. Sometimes the lion might be depicted with two heads looking back into the past and ahead into the future. One still sees the two lions of the Goddess at the entrances to buildings where one is the lion of yesterday and the other of today.

From Wikipedia: Lions have been represented figuratively since the Stone Age. Ice age hunters depicted the lion this way in the cultural stage of the Aurignacian more than 30,000 years ago by showing the lionesses of a pride hunting in the same manner as contemporary lions. After that it frequently was the lioness who was represented as the protector and chief warrior of a culture. An early Naqada tomb painting that predates Egyptian culture in northern Africa shows two rampant lions flanking a figure that may be interpreted as a deity.

    Lions also play a role in numerous later ancient cultures. In Ancient Egypt the pharaoh sometimes was represented as the sphinx, a lioness with a human head. The best known representation of this type is the Great Sphinx of Giza. From the earliest written human records, the lioness was recognized as the fierce hunter of the formidable species in Ancient Egyptian and African cultures and was dominant in the pantheons of these ancient cultures as representing warriors and protectors of the country. Egyptian mythology featured images of lionesses such as Bast and Sekhmet from their pantheon. Male rulers might be associated with the son of the goddess, such as Maahes. While the Egyptians ruled over Nubia they documented the worship of Dedun as a god of wealth and prosperity, who was said to be the son of the Nubian lioness deity, although they did not incorporate that deity into their own pantheon. The ancient Egyptians also created naturalistic portrayals of lions as symbols of protection and royal power in addition to the images of mythical sphinxes.

    In the near east a long line of cultures used the motif of Lions as both a symbol of primal and royal power. The earliest examples come from Mesopotamia. This usage continued throughout the later cultures of the Hittites, Babylonians, Assyrians, Persians and early Islamic cultures like the Umayyads and Abbassids